TRAINING FOR VOLUME AND INTENSITY

The Best Physiotherapists in Mohali, Pune, New Delhi, Gurgaon, Bhubaneswar, and Bangalore give you an understanding of Training for Volume and Intensity!

Whether you are working out just for physical fitness or as a professional athlete, you can reach a plateau very soon if you keep on doing the same activity repeatedly. After a point of time, the body adapts to the load being applied and stops showing improvements.

This is where the ‘overload principle’ comes into the picture. In simplest terms, the term overload principle means doing more with the body than what it is normally used to do. When it comes to exercise science, it can simply mean lifting more weight than the previous session or running a mile extra than the last run.

There can be multiple ways in which a body’s physical capacity can be overloaded. Of them, volume and intensity stand out as the most important ones.

VOLUME: volume is the total amount of weight lifted in a given session. It can be calculated by this simple equation:

sets x reps x weight

For example, 4 sets of 8 reps of barbell squats with 60 kg mean you have performed 32 reps for 60 kg each. Volume, in this case, would be 1920 kg.

To enhance performance, the volume needs to be altered carefully and gradually. Key points to be considered when working on volume are:

  1. A graded increase in the weight: this method can also be used interchangeably to increase the intensity. Keeping the number of reps the same, weight can be added on each rep to increase the resultant volume.
  2. Increasing the number of reps at the same weight: Keeping the weight constant, the number of reps can be increased per workout. For e.g.: depending on the goals, the no. of reps per set may be increased from 8 to 12 before attempting a weight increase.
  3. Increasing the number of sets: increasing a set per workout gradually at any one of the exercises can also be one of the methods to increase the total volume.

The reason why volume is one of the single most predictors of training outcomes is that it determines the duration for which the muscle is under tension. Known as TUT (time under tension), it increases the associated microtrauma of the muscle fibers, thus gradually increasing their fatigue threshold. This results in greater adaptations.

In terms of aerobic training, volume means the duration for which the activity was carried out. For eg; 30 minutes of running per session 2 days/week. In this case, the volume can be altered by changing the number of work out days or by modifying the duration of the activity.

INTENSITY: it is the amount of effort which is being put into the exercise. In terms of aerobic exercise, it can be represented as % of VO2 max, Rate of perceived exertion (RPE), % of maximum heart rate (HRmax), or % of Heart rate reserve (HRR).

In terms of resistance training, it is most commonly represented as a % of 1 repetition maximum (1 RM).

Activities such as walking or shooting are considered as low-intensity exercises. While 100-meter sprints, Olympic lifting, and Crossfit are considered as high-intensity activities because they require the individual to perform as per their maximal capacity.

Just like the volume, intensity can also be altered according to the goals to attain the desired results.

For aerobic training, activities at 70-80% of HRmax are considered as high intensity. Training in this zone increases the aerobic threshold thus improving the aerobic capacity.

Calculation of HRmax- 220-AGE. For e.g. if an individual of 30 years, the HRmax would be (220-30)= 190 beats/min. Now while prescribing a high intensity, any exercise which could reach 70-80% of HRmax ( 133-152 beats/min) could be used for training.

For resistance training, doing 6-12 reps at 67-85% of 1 RM causes muscular hypertrophy. raining for ≤6 reps at 85% of 1 RM improves muscular strength.1

In a nutshell, modifying these and certain other parameters result in improving performance. One thing that should be kept in mind when designing the exercise programs is that more is not always better. Sufficient rest supplemented with proper diet should be given to the body to recover before the next session.

Visit your nearest ABTP center to get individualized consultation with experts and help in periodizing your training programs for desired volume and intensity as per the sports conditioning requirements.

References:

The Best Physiotherapists in Mohali, Pune, New Delhi, Gurgaon, Bhubaneswar, and Bangalore give you an understanding of Hip Arthritis!

Whether you are working out just for physical fitness or as a professional athlete, you can reach a plateau very soon if you keep on doing the same activity repeatedly. After a point of time, the body adapts to the load being applied and stops showing improvements.

This is where the ‘overload principle’ comes into the picture. In simplest terms, the term overload principle means doing more with the body than what it is normally used to do. When it comes to exercise science, it can simply mean lifting more weight than the previous session or running a mile extra than the last run.

There can be multiple ways in which a body’s physical capacity can be overloaded. Of them, volume and intensity stand out as the most important ones.

VOLUME: volume is the total amount of weight lifted in a given session. It can be calculated by this simple equation:

sets x reps x weight

For example, 4 sets of 8 reps of barbell squats with 60 kg mean you have performed 32 reps for 60 kg each. Volume, in this case, would be 1920 kg.

To enhance performance, the volume needs to be altered carefully and gradually. Key points to be considered when working on volume are:

  1. A graded increase in the weight: this method can also be used interchangeably to increase the intensity. Keeping the number of reps the same, weight can be added on each rep to increase the resultant volume.
  2. Increasing the number of reps at the same weight: Keeping the weight constant, the number of reps can be increased per workout. For e.g.: depending on the goals, the no. of reps per set may be increased from 8 to 12 before attempting a weight increase.
  3. Increasing the number of sets: increasing a set per workout gradually at any one of the exercises can also be one of the methods to increase the total volume.

The reason why volume is one of the single most predictors of training outcomes is that it determines the duration for which the muscle is under tension. Known as TUT (time under tension), it increases the associated microtrauma of the muscle fibers, thus gradually increasing their fatigue threshold. This results in greater adaptations.

In terms of aerobic training, volume means the duration for which the activity was carried out. For eg; 30 minutes of running per session 2 days/week. In this case, the volume can be altered by changing the number of work out days or by modifying the duration of the activity.

INTENSITY: it is the amount of effort which is being put into the exercise. In terms of aerobic exercise, it can be represented as % of VO2 max, Rate of perceived exertion (RPE), % of maximum heart rate (HRmax), or % of Heart rate reserve (HRR).

In terms of resistance training, it is most commonly represented as a % of 1 repetition maximum (1 RM).

Activities such as walking or shooting are considered as low-intensity exercises. While 100-meter sprints, Olympic lifting, and Crossfit are considered as high-intensity activities because they require the individual to perform as per their maximal capacity.

Just like the volume, intensity can also be altered according to the goals to attain the desired results.

For aerobic training, activities at 70-80% of HRmax are considered as high intensity. Training in this zone increases the aerobic threshold thus improving the aerobic capacity.

Calculation of HRmax- 220-AGE. For e.g. if an individual of 30 years, the HRmax would be (220-30)= 190 beats/min. Now while prescribing a high intensity, any exercise which could reach 70-80% of HRmax ( 133-152 beats/min) could be used for training.

For resistance training, doing 6-12 reps at 67-85% of 1 RM causes muscular hypertrophy. raining for ≤6 reps at 85% of 1 RM improves muscular strength.1

In a nutshell, modifying these and certain other parameters result in improving performance. One thing that should be kept in mind when designing the exercise programs is that more is not always better. Sufficient rest supplemented with proper diet should be given to the body to recover before the next session.

Visit your nearest ABTP center to get individualized consultation with experts and help in periodizing your training programs for desired volume and intensity as per the sports conditioning requirements.

References:

  1. Essentials of strength training and conditioning, 4th edition. National strength and conditioning association.
  2. ACSM’s Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription, 10th edition.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *